Complete Blood Count (CBC)

Clinical definition of the Complete Blood Count (CBC) test
A hemogram is a systematic report of the findings from a blood examination especially with reference to the numbers, proportions, and morphological features of  the cellular elements of the blood. This test emphasizes the size, shape, special characteristics, and numbers of the solid components of the blood. It is actually a panel of tests that examines different parts of the blood and includes the following:

  • Leukocyte Count/Number of white blood cells (WBC)
  • Erthrocyte Count/Number of red blood cells (RBC)
  • Hemoglobin Content (Hgb)
  • Hematocrit (Hct)
  • Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV)
  • Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH)
  • Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin concentration (MCHC)
  • Platelet Count and Volume
  • Red cell Distribution Width (RDW)

Why is the Complete Blood Count (CBC) test done?
This test is carried out as a part of routine medical exam to determine general health status, and to screen for and monitor a variety of disorders such as anemia, infection and many other diseases.

What are the common signs/symptoms when the Complete Blood Count (CBC) test is done?

  • Fatigue
  • Weakness
  • Inflammation
  • Bruising
  • Excessive bleeding
  • Clotting inflammation
  • Chest pain
  • Dizziness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Easy bruising
  • Heavy menstrual bleeding
  • Fever higher than 100.5F (38C)
  • Chills
  • Heavy / Excessive Sweating

What should I do before the Complete Blood Count (CBC) test?

Specimen type

Specimen collection procedure

Preparatory instructions before the test *

EDTA (Blood Sample)

Venipuncture

Collection of blood from a vein, usually from the arm.

No Fasting Required.

No other special preparations required.

*Subjects suffering from any illness or on oral or injectable medications are advised to consult their physician prior to requesting any tests or procedures.

How do I interpret my Complete Blood Count (CBC) test results?

Test

Normal values

White blood cells (WBC)

4 to 10 x 10^9/L

Red blood cells (RBC) Erythrocyte count

Male

4.5 to 5.5mill/c.mm

Female

3.8to 4.8 mill/c.mm

Child

Day 1 - Day 2 

5.0 - 7.0 mill/c.mm

Day 3 - Day 6 

4.0 - 6.6 mill/c.mm

Day 7 - Day 13 

3.9 - 6.3 mill/c.mm

Day 14 - Day 29 

3.6 - 6.2 mill/c.mm

1 month - 1.5 months

3.0 - 5.4 mill/c.mm

2 months - 2.5 months

3.1 - 4.3 mill/c.mm

3 months - 6 months

4.1 - 5.3 mill/c.mm

6.5 months - 1 Yr. 11months

3.9 - 5.1 mill/c.mm

2 Years - 6 Years

4.0 - 5.2 mill/c.mm

6 Yrs 1 month - 12 Years

4.0 -5.2mill/c.mm  

Red cell distribution width (RDW)

Male

11.5%

Female

11.5 to 15%

Child

1-2 years

11.5 -16%

2.1-9 years

11.5- 15%

9.1- 17 years

11.5-14%

Platelet count volume (PCV)

Male

40 to 54%

Female

35 to 47%

Child

Day 1 – Day 2

45-75%

Day 3 – Day 6

45-67%

Day 7- Day 13

42-66%

2months – 2.5 months

28-42%

3months – 6 months

30-40%

6.5mnths 1yr. 11months

30-38%

2years – 6 years

34-40%

6years 1mnth- 12years

35-45%

Adolescent Male

37 - 49 %

Adolescent Female

36 - 46 %

Platelet count

Cord blood

100 to 290 x 1000/c.mm

1 year

100 to 300 x 1000/ c.mm

Neonate

150 to 390 x 1000/c.mm

Infant

200 to 473 x 1000/ c.mm

1 – 17 years

150 to 400 x 1000/c.mm

Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH)

0.1 – 1 year

33 to 39 pg

1 – 2  years

24 to 30 pg

2.1 -  9 years

25 to 31 pg

9.1 – 17 years

26 to 32 pg

Mean corpuscular volume (MCV)

0.1 – 1 year

102 to 115 fl

1 – 2 year

72 to 88fl

2.1 to 9 year

76 to 90fl

9.1 to 17 years

78 to 95fl

Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC)

30-35%

Hemoglobin

 

Male

13.5 to 17.5 gm/dl

Female

12 to 15.6 gm/dl

Child

 

Day 3 – Day 6

15.0- 21.0 g/dl

Day 7 – Day 13

13.5 - 21.5 g/dl

Day 14 – Day 29

12.5 - 20.5 g/dl

Day 1 – Day 2

14.0 - 22.0 g/dl

3 months - 6 months 

11.1-14.1 g/dl

6.5 mnts - 1 Yr. 11 months :

11.1- 14.1 g/dl

2 Years - 6 Years 

11.0 – 14. 0 g/dl

6 Yrs 1 months – 12 years

11.5 – 15.5 g/dl

‘*A Reference range is a set of values which helps the healthcare professional to interpret a medical test. It may vary with age, gender, and other factors. Reference ranges may also vary between labs, in value & units depending on instruments used and method of establishment of reference ranges’

Diseases/conditions related to the Complete Blood Count (CBC) test

  • Vitamin B12 Deficiency
  • Iron Deficiency Anemia
  • Hypochromia
  • Hyperchromia
  • Thalassemias
  • Hereditary spherocytosis
  • Pernicious Anemia
  • Leukemia
  • Hypersplenism 
  • Polycythemia

Synonyms : Haemogram
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CBC (Complete Blood Count)

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