Luteinizing hormone (LH)

Clinical definition of the Leutinizing hormone test
Luteinizing hormone is produced by the anterior pituitary gland in the brain and plays an important role in sexual development. A luteinizing hormone test measures the amount of this hormone in a sample of blood or urine. In women, LH regulates the menstrual cycle and egg release (ovulation). LH (leutinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) prompt the ovaries to begin producing the hormone estrogen, which causes a girl’s body to mature and prepare for menstruation. An acute rise of LH called the ‘LH surge’ triggers ovulation and development of the corpus luteum. Luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels rise and fall in sync during the monthly menstrual cycle. In men, LH stimulates the production of testosterone, which plays a role in sperm production.

Why is the Leutinizing hormone test done?
LH testing is used to evaluate

  • Pituitary function
  • A woman’s egg supply (ovarian reserve)
  • A man’s sperm count
  • Menstrual problems, such as irregular or absent menstrual periods (amenorrhea)
  • Gonadal failure
  • Pituitary tumors
  • Monitor a woman's response to medicines given to stimulate ovulation.
  • Determine why sexual features or organs are not developing when they should (delayed puberty)
  • For diagnosis and confirmation of Menopause

What are the common signs/symptoms when the Luteinizing hormone test is done?
When a Boy or girl does not appear to be entering puberty at an appropriate age (either too late or too soon). Signs of early (precocious) puberty may include:

  • Breast enlargement in females
  • Growth of pubic hair
  • Genitalia growth in males
  • Beginning of menstruation in females
  • Precocious puberty is beginning of menses in a girl before 9 yrs of age

What should I do before the luteinizing hormone test?

Specimen type

Specimen collection procedure

Preparatory instructions before the test *

Serum      
(Blood Sample)

Venipuncture

Collection of blood from a vein, usually from the arm.

Majority of hormonal blood tests, in cases of infertility or menstrual irregularities are preferably done on Day 3-5 on menses

No Fasting required

No other special preparations required.

 

*Subjects suffering from any illness or on oral or injectable medications are advised to consult their physician prior to requesting any tests or procedures.

How do I interpret my luteinizing hormone test results?

Gender

Reference range*

Male

1.2- 7.8 mIU/ml

Female

I] Normal menstruating women

Follicular phase

1.7-15.0 mIU/ml

Mid cycle peak

21.9- 56.6 mIU/ml

Luteal phase

0.6-16.3 mIU/ml

II] Post menopausal

14.2- 52.3 mIU/ml

Children

Boy

Girl

8-15days

< 0.7

< 0.7

1-3 years

0.8-1.3

0.9-1.9

4-6 years

0.7-6.5

0.7-0.9

7-8 years

0.7-1.3

0.7-2.0

9-10 years

0.7-2.1

0.7-2.3

11 years

0.3-1.4

0.3-6.2

12years

0.3-3.5

0.5-9.8

13 years

0.4-4.6

0.4-4.6

14years

0.6-5.8

0.5-25.0

15 years

0.5-7.1

5-16

16years

0.5-8.0

0.6-21.0

17 years

0.9-4.5

1.7-11.0

18years

1.6-4.8

2.3-11.0

*A Reference range is a set of values which helps the healthcare professional to interpret a medical test. It may vary with age, gender, and other factors. Reference ranges may also vary between labs, in value & units depending on instruments used and method of establishment of reference ranges.

Diseases/conditions related to the luteinizing hormone test

  • Anovulatory bleeding/ Irregularly irregular menses
  • Infertility
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN)
  • Ovarian cysts
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
  • Turner's syndrome
  • Kalllmann's syndrome
  • Adrenal disease
  • Thyroid disease
  • Ovarian tumor
  • Mumps

Other tests related to the luteinizing hormone test

  • FSH
  • Testosterone
  • Progesterone
  • Estradiol
  • Total estrogens
  • Clearblue fertility monitor
  • TSH

Synonyms : Interstitial Cell Stimulating Hormone (ICSH), Lutropin
Book This Test
LH (Luteinizing hormone)

Book Related Tests
  • Progesterone
  • FSH, LH, Prolactin
  • Prolactin

Read About Related Tests
FB TWITTER